This is photograph of a bakery called American Bakery or Irfan Bakery in Ortaköy taken in June of 1922 while Istanbul was still occupied by the Allies following World War I. It was adjacent to a Jewish Orphanage and orphan school. The exterior shows the diversity of its clientele with Armenian, Ladino (Hebrew letters), English, Ottoman, Greek and Russian signage. The accompanying caption with the picture read: “An interesting neighbor of the orphanage is a little bakery which calls itself the “American Bakery” in several languages. Samples of the bread are nailed to the store-front, fresh each morning. And here is the smiling baker himself!”Near East Relief official photograph, Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection (LOC -http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2001696166/)For more visit: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/

This is photograph of a bakery called American Bakery or Irfan Bakery in Ortaköy taken in June of 1922 while Istanbul was still occupied by the Allies following World War I. It was adjacent to a Jewish Orphanage and orphan school. The exterior shows the diversity of its clientele with Armenian, Ladino (Hebrew letters), English, Ottoman, Greek and Russian signage. The accompanying caption with the picture read: “An interesting neighbor of the orphanage is a little bakery which calls itself the “American Bakery” in several languages. Samples of the bread are nailed to the store-front, fresh each morning. And here is the smiling baker himself!”

Near East Relief official photograph, Frank and Frances Carpenter Collection (LOC -http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2001696166/)

For more visit: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com/

Ottoman Divers
For more: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com

I know what it looks like, but this is not a photograph from the set of Dünyayı Kurtaran Adam or another Yeşilçam B-movie. It is a group photo of the battalion divers from the Ottoman Imperial Navy displaying their then state of the art diving equipment. This image is part of a collection commissioned under Abdul Hamid II to show all aspects of the Ottoman Empire’s modernization program. We have
 shared others from the collection before, and you can find many more here:http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/ahii/I found this one originally shared here:https://www.facebook.com/ottomankhelafaThe battalion divers at the Imperial Naval Arsenal, Abdul Hamid II collection c. 1880-1893 (LOC -http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2003671817/)

Ottoman Divers

For more: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com

I know what it looks like, but this is not a photograph from the set of Dünyayı Kurtaran Adam or another Yeşilçam B-movie. It is a group photo of the battalion divers from the Ottoman Imperial Navy displaying their then state of the art diving equipment. This image is part of a collection commissioned under Abdul Hamid II to show all aspects of the Ottoman Empire’s modernization program. 

We have

 shared others from the collection before, and you can find many more here:http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/ahii/

I found this one originally shared here:https://www.facebook.com/ottomankhelafa

The battalion divers at the Imperial Naval Arsenal, Abdul Hamid II collection c. 1880-1893 (LOC -http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2003671817/)
Beirut during French Occupation, World War I
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This image shows the Hamidiyyeh clock tower in the center of Beirut following the French capture of the city. French colonial rule took the place of Ottoman imperial rule in Greater Syria for the next quarter century. The French mandate in Syria and Lebanon lasted until 1943, and the last French troops left in 1946. Downtown Beirut is much changed since Ottoman rule, but the clock tower, the construction of which began on Abdul Hamid II’s birthday January 9, 1897, still stands, having been restored following decades of conflict in 1994.Beirut, Lebanon, 22 November 1919 (Frederic Gadmer, Albert Kahn Collection)

Beirut during French Occupation, World War I

For more, visit: http://www.ottomanhistorypodcast.com

This image shows the Hamidiyyeh clock tower in the center of Beirut following the French capture of the city. French colonial rule took the place of Ottoman imperial rule in Greater Syria for the next quarter century. The French mandate in Syria and Lebanon lasted until 1943, and the last French troops left in 1946. Downtown Beirut is much changed since Ottoman rule, but the clock tower, the construction of which began on Abdul Hamid II’s birthday January 9, 1897, still stands, having been restored following decades of conflict in 1994.

Beirut, Lebanon, 22 November 1919 (Frederic Gadmer, Albert Kahn Collection)